Make your website a web sight.

Good web design starts with good communication. That’s why I talk to you from the beginning through every step of the way.

Wireframing

Wireframes are like blueprints for websites. Rough sketches. They get the idea across about the page layout and the positioning of elements on a page.

Gray boxes. That’s essentially what wireframes are. They’re not meant to be pretty — their being plain helps maintain the focus of this step of the process.

You can skip the wireframe process, and many web designers do, but that can introduce complications later on. Ample communication of design expectations ensures everyone is on the same page, and wireframing is an important step to achieve that.

Wireframing


Designing

Designs in the form of website mockups determine the look and feel of a website. Creating these mockups is a crucial step in building a website, as what shows up in the design process is most likely going to appear on the final website. This is where colors, textures, fonts, and shapes are introduced.

First we talk about sites in (or outside of) your industry that appeal to you, and why (if we haven’t during the wireframing process). Based on that conversation, a homepage is designed, sent to you, and then modified based on your feedback. Once that’s approved, a subpage of the site is designed, sent, discussed, modified, and finalized.

Designing


Building

Make pretend real. This is where Photoshop images are converted to HTML, CSS, and JavaScript and worked into either static pages or a content management system (CMS) such as WordPress or Drupal.

Static websites are easier and cheaper to build in the short-term, but CMSes are almost always the wiser choice for maintaining sites in the long-term. The complexity of Drupal outweighs the complexity of WordPress, but depending on the scope of your site, that complexity can pay off with additional functionality.

Building


(Testing &) Deploying

Does everything look right in the major web browsers in both Windows and OS X? (Note: They don’t need to look the same.) Does the functionality work as expected? Do all the links point to valid pages, internally and externally? Is every page on the site unique with unique title tags? Is there only one URL for the website (either www or non-www)?

These are the questions to ask before deployment. Sufficient testing often means a site can go live with fewer hitches along the way.

Deploying


Maintaining

The end is the merely beginning: Updating and maintaining a site should happen on a regular basis. Maintenance can include delivering monthly SEO reports that measure progress, or creating and incorporating design elements or features that weren’t part of the initial building of the website.

Maintaining